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on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
there are maybe two categories of copulation. those having political power. it is a matter of foreign policy. the other category deals with millions of people for which you have information from private service providers. you can ask them to provide information before providing it to the nsa. first, you have the harvest everything. this is under the category of population outside the scope of international security. which is quite wider than other countries. it is not a solution that we have in europe, and that is why when we see this data collected, we cannot only think of fighting against terrorism, but also thinking about offering things like that. >> we say it is about stopping terrorists, but is it about having a competitive edge, trolling for consumer behaviors and getting an edge on the competition in an economic war rather than a war on terrorism? >> everybody is paying everybody. they collect data. imagine 42% increase since 2010. everybody is collaborating with this kind of cyber espionage and criminality. it is not a question of one or the other, everyone is doing that. in 2012, t
frank discussions. mark, you and i have covered foreign policy a long time. this is a very unhappy group of people. to a certain extent there's spying everywhere. we know that. it's a little shock. there's gambling at mr. rick's. the germans want the same special relationship of no spying agreement that we have with the uk. at the same time, i think there really is anger about they said the flash point was merkel's cell phone. >> yeah, i think that's right, andrea. it's not just anger but embarrassment on their part. remember, the first allegations of potential nsa surveillance in europe came up during the summer. at the time the germans were among those saying we understand it. we think as a dispute it's ebbing away. our concerns have been more or less met. i think there's now a feeling they climbed down and didn't make a huge case out of it in the summer only to find out it was more persuasive, lasted longer and involved the top official and their government. so they have a lot of egg on their own face. what was interesting about the long article der spiegel published over the weekend,
of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. it is also
american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can add spain to the list of countries that are demanding answers. the newest details emerge in this spanish newspaper "el mundo" reporting that phone calls from surveye survei. over the weekend came news that the nsa has been monitoring calls from german chancellor angela merkel as far back a as 2002. >> i think the most important thing is to find a basis for the future on which we can operate, and as i said today trust needs to be rebuilt which implies that trust has been severely shaken, and the members of the european union share these concerns today. true change is necessary. >> reporter: when barack obama was running for president in 2008 he went to german and pledged a new era of u
the circle so no has a clue. this happens again and again on spine, foreign-policy issues. he seems to be the last man to know. >> have you seen the latest poll? 42%. at 63% want to replace their own member of congress. the highest number ever recorded going back to 1982. peter hart said this is -- howard said this is a howard eel moment. moment. bute have seen the debate the american public have seen some ugly months in washington. down byrnment gets shut the republicans, that makes him mad. the issue goes away and all of a sudden they look at obamacare and the president not telling the whole truth and that infuriates them even further. i remained skeptical that even though 63% or 67% say throw the bums out including my own that this will happen. let's face it. are alwaysion rates in the 90 percentile. we are more likely to see that happen again unless we have a waves andave seen the only way we get to a wave where one party gets the brunt of the anger is if the government shuts down again. >> i think she makes very good points. that 63% number. throw them all out being the highest
on spying, foreign-policy issues. he seems to be the last man to know. >> have you seen the latest poll? he is at 42%. a 5% drop in one month. here is another number. 63% want to replace their own member of congress. the highest number ever recorded going back to 1982. -- 1992. peter hart said this is a howard beale moment. as madrican people are as hell and they are not going to take it anymore. how will that anger manifest itself down the road? >> we have seen the debate but the american public have seen some ugly months in washington. the government gets shut down by the republicans, that makes him -- them mad. mad. the issue goes away and all of a sudden they look at the obamacare rollout and the president not telling the whole truth and that infuriates them even further. i remained skeptical that even though 63% or 67% say throw the bums out including my own that this will happen. let's face it. the reelection rates are always in the 90 percentile. i think we are more likely to see that happen again unless we have a wave, we have seen waves and the only way we get to a wave where one p
outer liberal economic policies and probably they don't like he is anti-russian foreign policy and at a certain moment he will have to choose because, yes, he made the capitol in russia but he will continue his own foreign policy and so far he has been maneuvering between russia and the west. but if he is serious about joining the european union or having associate membership, the union will require him to worsen relations with russia and that happened to ukraine and not avoided by georgia. >> in the uk the defunct news of the world newspaper rebecca brooks and kandi corazon are in court to stand trial on phone hacking charges so let's go to roy who is outside of the court in london and tell us what is going to happen, roary. >> reporter: david, this starts with a bang on the first day is mostly procedural so we are likely to see the swearing in of the jury and we will get an outline really of how the trial is going to proceed. we won't actually have much of the nitty gritty of the trial or evidence or anything like that on the first day. we will see the defendants in court. 8
on the public? finally, what are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no random -- no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference
an impact on u.s. foreign policy, on the way it talks and discusses and not only that, collects information, and it's also having an impact in the fact that, you know, lots of people in europe, especially leaders, are not cutting the u.s. as much slack as they might have done in the past. partly, they're saying, because the u.s. under the obama administration, is backing off a lot of the burden sharing, a lot of the heavy lifting that traditionally the u.s. has done in support of its allies over the past. >> because of the fallout, bought of the anger amongst the world leaders, julian, do you think someone's head should roll over this? >> well, we're going to see what the administration does. i think two things to remember. president obama himself raised a lot of the expectations about the differences with how he would conduct national security operations and those resonated both here and around the world. so it might be that in the end, he tries to blame someone. he himself now by -- with this report coming out that he ordered this to stop, it's something of an admission this shouldn't be
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
states to our conduct of foreign policy, to the defense matters, to economic matters. and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> and the full interview with dick cheney going to air this afternoon on the lead with jake tapper at 4:00 p.m. eastern. you're not going to want to miss that. also want to bring in christiane amanpour in the london news room talking about the nsa, the spying, of course, the aftermath of the allies really upset about this. one thing you said earlier today that really struck us here is that you said there was a deficit of good will among u.s. allies. and that's part of the reason why they are so so frustrated and angry right now. why is there a deficit of good will among our allies? >> well, it's interesting you just played that clip of former vice president cheney. let's go back to the cheney/bush years which april pex was all the angst and anger over the unite at the iraq
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
>>> the country's top diplomat is on a foreign policy triage mission. secretary of state john kerry is busy mending fences with middle eastern allies unhappy with what president obama is doing and not doing. chief washington correspondent james rosen takes a look. >> reporter: it was the largest anti-american demonstration in iran in years. and it occurred 34 years to the day after iranian militants at the same location seized the u.s. embassy in tehran and took scores of americans hostage. to many in iran, the u.s. remains the great satan, even as the core complaints are updated. >> they wiretap their allies. how can they compromise with their archenemy. >> reporter: in secretary of state john kerry confronted the perception among america's arab allies that president obama is to eager to cut a deal with iran on its nuclear program. >> nothing that we are doing with respect to this negotiation will alter or upset or get in the way of the relationship between the united states and saudi arabia and the relationship in this region. >> reporter: saudi foreign minister denies iran's relationship
and they are very upset. you think what implications will this have not only on foreign policy and trade but what's preventing them from saying screw you to us. >> you know what's preventing them? we're the exceptional nation. what are you going to do? >> i think president obama has serious mending to do and i don't think he deserves the blame but he has a job ahead of him to rebuild the trust. >> we're witnessing a surveillance industrial complex that is increasingly going rogue. it's broader at home and broader abroad than they told the president. >> what they are doing to us. >> i have to be on record i do believe what the president has said this week and i have to be on the r0rd there's a problem when the nsa doesn't tell the president what they are doing at this high level. >> the fans have been weighing in and saying whether they believe the president was ignorant of what the nsa was doing. 46% said the president probably did know about the program. several ways you can get involved here. the poll is up on the facebook page and also on the cycle.msnbc.com. one of the great legal minds of ou
-- on how to achieve a foreign- policy objective. in on personal cell phone calls, does that go too far? guest: our leaders need to apply a balancing test. they have to weigh the foreign intelligence game from such a sensitive axes, like you are saying, in particular intercept of a foreign leader's phone call. a foreign-policy flap would result if it was disclosed. you have to apply that balancing. i think judging from the newspapers that is what the white house is doing this week. they are reviewing the posture of the intelligence community on these collection priorities. are going to apply this test to see what makes sense for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our c
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
on people relying on the new health care system. >>> plus, a tough week for the president's foreign policy. new revelations about u.s. spying on allies, including the bugging of the german chancellor's phone. undermines critical relationships at a sensitive time. >>> and does the mideast trust this president? the fallout between syria and iran. the conflicts of global influences ahead. our roundtable is talking about politics and parenting this week after maryland's attorney general is spotted at a beach party where mine oors are drink. and nbc's brian williams reflects on hurricane sandy, one year ago. the wounds that haven't healed on the jersey shore are personal to him. all of that is ahead on "meet the press" on sunday, october 27. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning to you. obama care fix is on, but will it work? here are some of the latest developments. the end of november is the timeline the administration is now targeting to have the obama care website running smoothly. the latest re
interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world leaders. take a listen to this. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states but also in france and germany and throughout europe. and we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> so, mark, we have allies that are upset with
to foreign policy, as much as possible you should put partisan politics aside and get the job done. that's what i've always tried to do. i give credit to governor christie for doing it. that's how the country will go forward, not by shutting down the government and not by making everything an overly partisan issue. >> republican congressman of new york, peter king. thanks for coming on today and making time for me. >> thank you. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪avo: sales event is "sback.hen drive" which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry, this offer ends october 31st. for details, visit vwdealer.com today. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commi
point out, nsa situation obviously a huge domestic and foreign policy issue, health care is his signature achievement to this point in his presidency. you would think he would be more in the loop is a way of saying it than he has been. >> how much of this shock that's being expressed by the allies just simply to try to get some leverage with the u.s. because everyone knew this was going on and they do it to us and we do it to them. the world of spying. >> you have to express anger this is going on. if you suspected or knew it was going on. they can use it effectively for leverage. the question now is whether or not united states is going to enter into new nonspying agreements with countries they have long resisted entering these agreements with. so whether it's the french or germans, you know, they now have a good deal of leverage to try to negotiate these pacts if they so choose. it's quite possible one result is there will be more nonspying agreements with european allies than there were before. >> i would bet on germany and not on france, just saying. mark mazzetti and chris
with a as reaction to bush who was so dumb. this guy is a genius. is he a policy guy. he is not a policy guy. he is a talker. >> that is it for the panel. stay tuned to see how the president played the odds in foreign policy. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. >>> finally tonight, president obama is under fire from world leaders for tapping their cell phones and listening in. one show points out he is really just staying true to his own word. >> true partnership and true progress require constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require allies who will listen to each other, learn from each other, and most of all trust each other. [cheers and applause] >> listen, learn, trust, you know, two out of three ain't bad. >> thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that is it for this "special report," fair, balanced and unafraid. don't forget tomorrow is a big day on capitol hill.
for this president. you know, this president, his foreign policy doctrine, and i think it's a good thing, has relied very strongly on partnerships. this has not been a president who's wanted to cowboy into situations on his own. we will always defend ourselves and our interests unilaterally, but from the very beginning of his presidency, he has wisely, in my way of thinking, emphasized the need to build partnerships. if you're going to try to do that, then instances like this can be particularly corrosive. so the president needs to, with our allies and with the american public, be very clear about what has happened but also about the dramatic steps that are going to be taken to put these programs back into some acceptable form. the american public knows that we've got major security challenges. we have to keep the american public safe. but right now, you know, i think i saw a washington post editorial that said the nsa is losing the benefit of the doubt. they get the benefit of the doubt because they're keeping us safe, but these recent revelations are causing them to lose the benefit of the doubt,
of conduct of foreign policy since u.s. revolutionary war times, since the beginning of history you have had pies. what is different is technology, the capability to listen in to everything. and i think that that is what the administration is dealing with is technology so different we'll have to think about new rules of the road. >> i was going to say in this question of running amuck being on auto pilot you used that borrowed, that ask what sect of state kerry said. you add this technological capability if it's running on auto pilot and people who are overseeing don't know what it's doing, then it has this control and overseers don't know what it's doing and one of the amazing things what nsa was doing with google and yahoo! scraping all of their data out of the area that ability does make it seem like the nsa has found new mothers for itself that the people who were supposed to other sees, supposed to keep this kelp del cat wall between safety and civil liberties they don't know what is going on. >> the mystery here is the between what john said they can do and what they actually are doin
million of us are being spied on as well as the rest of the world. if you want to talk about foreign-policy, i have the democrats and republicans, it is not good. we need to take a step back, look at what we're doing and then make wise choices. thanks. chris from california is next. chris on our independent line. think this nsa program has been way out of line since it began during the bush administration where the american people find out about it. president in our past history called nixon who is spying on a hotel and he was forced to resign. whether obama knew about this or not, he supposed to know this and if he did not know he should resign for lack of ability to do his job heard this is insane what we're doing. we are spying on every human being possible am a friend, foe, everything. example that we are sending to children. do think we can rebuild trust in this issue? inler: i think the trust this country has been down the tubes for the last 15 or 20 years. you can show many examples of that. thes not just the nsa, now tpp has been going on for years now. nobody in this country knows
to congressional arm-twisting, the big reform to incremental change and the big foreign policy ambition to cultivating head of state relationships. it means that obama has appeared to be caught unaware as controversies envelop his administration. the west wing that he runs seems more like liabilities than benefits, raising questions about how much information obama wants and how he receives it. this president doesn't seem to be as relentlessly curious about the process of government. from peter baker -- peter baker writes, those cases underscore the difficult choices in what to tell a president. aides determined that it would be inappropriate for the president to have advanced knowledge of the irs investigation. beresident should not involved in such investigations or law-enforcement cases because it could politicize them. john tuck said he was not bothered asnot as other republicans about mr. obama's not knowing about the problems with the health-care system in advance. i would never put the finger on somebody saying they should have known or might have known. what difference does it m
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
is in trouble, whether in foreign col se policy or domest, congressman tray goudie joining us next. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "juggle a bunch of rotating categories" card. it's not the "sign up for rewards each quarter" card. it's the no-games, no-messing-'round, no-earning-limit-having, do-i-look-like-i'm-joking, turbo-boosting, heavyweight-champion- of-the-world cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every damn day. now, tell me, what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. ido more with less with buss energy.hp is help. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide t
is in trouble, whether in foreign col se policy or domest, >> senator jeff sessions today announcing that the department of health and human services quietly dropped a no-bid contract that would have promoted obamacare to prisoners, this condition cancellation aftr sessions asked hhs why they chose to create a special program for prisoners when they spent certain million on -- $ 70s million on so-called obama navigators for everyone. they pointed to a community add vo cassie organization, based in chicago, it appears daylight, is still an ant septic for all sorts of things. >> first obama administration toivonennintestify, before a hoe committee apologized, then maintained sim is working. -- system is working. the head. the centers for medicare and medicaid services construct what is the very least an alternative universe. >> we have a system that is working, we'll improve the speed of that system. >> excuse me. -- >> yes. >> you are saying the system right now is working? >> i'm saying it is working, it is just not working at the speed we want and the success rate wement. those are
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct, our foreign policy, to defense matters, to economic matters, and i am a strong supporter of it. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper announced overnight he is declassifying a trove of documents about the collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance acts, or first ssa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexen direction will be testify on the hill about that program. you can be sure they're going to be getting questions about spying overseas, how far it should go and what limits the administration is considering placing on it now. >> this is a huge story, especially in europe. jim sciutto, thank you very much. >>> republican senator lindsey graham turning up the heat on the obama administration for its handling of last year's benghazi rror attack and its aftermath. the outspoken critic of the administration is threatening to block all presidential nomination, before the senate until survivors of that attack testify before congress. take a listen to graham on f
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
of democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate. it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against and it said he is doing a of things wrong and has not fulfilled his promises and his governing -- and he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it. he is allowing too much influence by iran which is also shiite which is the same as his government. they called that a malign influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, that since 2011, al- maliki has promised a number of times to have an inclusive power-sharing government. one was nominally set up. by the account of john mccain and others who wrote that has set abouti to dismantle that government or undermine it. he is accompanied this trip by a sunni defense minister and a ministero foreign representing other blocs. is that that is just for show and that he really intends to continue to govern from a shiite-first perspective and so far, he has been able to essentially
in charge, the foreign policy guy he's the chief executive of the united states government responsible for the irs and all the agencies under him. maybe you consider that conceptual but it's real an every time something gets screwed up out there there's a sense he may not be involved. that's not way it ought to be. we only get one guy in there and that's the chief executive and he ought to be accountable. >> chris matthews thank you so much. we'll see you tonight at 7:00 on "hardball." julie pace thank you as well. i hope you put up with me. chuck and michael steele stay with us if you can. up next superstorm sandy one year later. we revisit one of the hardest hit areas. plus senator chuck schumer on what's still need in the recovery efforts. in the coming addition joe will be taking part in a series of events to mark the upcoming publication of his brand new book "the right path." it's the right time for this book. it scares me, actually. things kick off on monday november 11th at columbia university the miller theater there. he'll sit down with jon meacham. you can get free admissio
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
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